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Posts Tagged ‘ultra-Orthodox’

On January 12-13, Hartman Institute executive staff and scholars will participate in the “Israel 2021 Conference ,” an event sponsored by The Marker newspaper and the Reut Institute. The conference will assemble hundreds of participants around 150 round tables moderated by experts in diverse fields to discuss what has been defined as the most pressing socioeconomic issues in Israel today, with an eye to developing solid strategies for the future of Israeli society. Guest speakers at the event will include Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu and Bank of Israel Governor Stanley Fisher.

Hartman executive staff and scholars will participate in the following round-table discussions:

Education – This discussion will examine methods for enhancing governance in the education system, such as creating and implementing long-term policies, improving infrastructure, and identifying major challenges. Participants from the Hartman Institute will include Executive Director Hana Gilat, Shraga Bar-On, Be’eri program director Dani Elazar, and director of the Be’eri School for Teacher Education Rani Jaeger.

Arab society and economic growth – 56% of Israel’s Arab citizens are economically disadvantaged, not having benefited from the opportunities of Israel’s economic growth. How can the government rectify the situation? Weighing in from the Hartman Institute are Rabbi Dr. Ariel Picard, Dror Yinon, and Rabbi Dr. Rachel Sabath Beit-Halachmi.

Integrating the ultra-Orthodox sector into the Israeli economy and labor force – How can members of the ultra-Orthodox sector most effectively become integrated into Israel’s labor market? Participating in the discussion from the Institute are Channa Pinchasi, Shraga Bar-On, and Rabbi Dr. Rachel Sabath Beit-Halachmi.

Israel quantum leap:  economy and society  –  How can Israel generate a quantum leap in its society and economy for the benefit of generations to come? Rabbi Dr. Donniel Hartman, president of the Institute, and Channa Pinchasi will participate in the discussion.

Get more information about “Israel 2021 Conference,” or register now.

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Reflections Newsletter from Shalom Hartman InstituteThe newest issue of Reflections, the Shalom Hartman Institute electronic magazine of ideas, is now online. Read these five great articles:

Israeli Society and the ‘Society of Learners’

Professors Shlomo Naeh, Zvi Zohar and Elhanan Reiner discuss the place of Torah scholars within the Jewish People throughout the generations, and the relevance of models from Jewish history to the current political rift

The Secrets of ‘Guide to the Perplexed’

Dr. Micah Goodman, who is currently completing the first book in Hebrew that is completely dedicated to the Guide to the Perplexed, explains why he also chose to reveal its secrets

Ancient Jewish Magic

Dr. Ishay Rosen-Zvi surveys Yovel Harari’s book on magic in Judaism, which shatters some of the myths relating to magic

Devekut

As shown by Dr.Adam Afterman, devekut was a marginal commandment in the time of the Sages. Only under the influence of external philosophies did the great medieval Jewish thinkers give it a new meaning and a more significant status

Abraham Abulafia

Professor Moshe Idel’s survey clarifies how even amongst self-declared messiahs, the 13th century Abulafia was a unique figure

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In a lecture this week to rabbis at Shalom Hartman Institute for the annual summertime Rabbinical Torah Study Seminar, Donniel Hartman mentioned that he had just finished a session with senior IDF commanders attending an ongoing program at Shalom Hartman Institute, the Lev Aharon program.

This program teaches Judaism, Jewish moral philosophy, and other related matters to senior officers of the IDF (majors, lieutenant colonels and colonels), in an effort to help them better understand their roles as defenders of the Jewish nation, and to explain the same to their soldiers, some of whom have rudimentary Jewish knowledge. The program is not about teaching kashrut, Shabbat observance, or ritual, but the historical, cultural, and moral underpinnings of the Jewish nation.

So, Donniel was saying how the officers were complaining that some religious soldiers are taking extreme stands on matters and, for example, are not willing to listen to a female singer during Army celebrations or ceremonies. Or, the commanders asked, what do we do when we go away for a unit retreat and some soldiers want single-sex swimming hours in the pool. Donniel said the commanders are struggling with such real, “tachlis” (detailed) conundrums.

It seemed to me that some of the rabbis in the room were skeptical that the situation was so complicated, or at least found it difficult to believe that such internal problems could occur in a Jewish army. I’ll admit, I thought so, too, to a degree.

So, imagine my surprise when I saw this article today on Ynetnews: Rabbi Eliyahu warns of rabbis who ‘kowtow to women’:

Former Chief Rabbi Mordechai Eliyahu warned this week of the rising prominence of the liberal stream in religious Zionism and slammed rabbis who “kowtow to women.”

During a Torah lesson he delivered on Monday, the prominent national religious leader spoke in length about the importance of observing chastity codes. He advised soldiers to cover their ears during military ceremonies that include women singing. “It’s better to go to jail than to obey the commander and hear a woman sing or play.”

….Eliyahu’s son, Rabbi Shmuel Eliyahu, also referred to the issue of women performing in military events. He commented on a recent statement by the chief education officer, who said religious soldiers must stay put during such ceremonies, despite the halachic problem.

“This order is clearly illegal,” said Eliyahu. “A person cannot be forced to go against the Torah. Today it’s singing, tomorrow it’s singing plus half naked women… a breach in such a question is like fire – you don’t know where it’s going to end.”

Just when you thought you had heard it all: “Today it’s singing…you don’t know where it’s going to end.” I don’t mean to make light: this is an important matter. Donniel did not say what he counseled the officers to do. But it is clearly a matter in which the Shalom Hartman Institute can play an important role in helping the jewish army of the State of israel remain both Jewish and democratic.

Hattip to the excellent blog, Religion and State in Israel.

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It’s not what you think. In fact, it’s even more. Here’s the opening paragraph:

We Jews have been saying, “Next year in Jerusalem,” for 2,000 years. We have continued to recite it even since the rebirth of Israel and the reunification of Jerusalem. As such, this statement has become a vehicle for expressing the central place that Jerusalem plays in our collective national and religious consciousness. Jerusalem is a carrier of our dreams and our aspirations to live as a free and independent Jewish people, together in our own country.

Click here to read the entire post.

Click here to read the post in Hebrew.

Donniel’s column on Hebrew news website, News 1.

לחץ כן כדי לקרוא את הכתבה בעברית

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